German Shepherd Puppies in Washington State

Signers of the German Shepherd Dog of America "Breeder's Code of Ethics"

We are not a whole sale dealer; our German Shepherds are bred and raised at Chinook Valley Farm.

CVF Front View of Farm Echowood German Shepherds at Chinook Valley Farm

Phone: (360) 777-8888

Cell: (360) 520-3880

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Four Dogs

Dog Obedience Training in Washington State

Even the most beautiful dog can be aggravating if it doesn't behave around a variety of people or when you take it out for a walk. Gain the confidence you need to take your dog anywhere by turning to Echowood German Shepherds. We offer dog obedience training in Washington State. We use a proven method of obedience training to teach your pet how to act in all settings.


Cost for the private one-on-one lesson with our German Shepherd breeder is $150. The training collar and training manual are provided. The manual outlines the lessons that are to be continued at his home. The handler works with his dog daily, returning for a follow-up session usually in one week. Follow up lessons are $20 and last about 30 minutes; these lessons are with other dogs in attendance.

The first training/counseling lesson lasts about one hour. This session should include the dog's handler and his human family. Everyone involved with the dog must be on the same mindset regarding the dog's obedience training. For instance, when calling the dog, he will become confused, anxious, and frustrated if different commands and signals are given.

The prong training collar that the Woodworth Method uses is the squeeze or sometimes called the pinch collar. This collar does not pinch the dog's neck but mimic's the behavior dogs use to correct one another. When a German Shepherd pup bites his mother testing her response, the dam will place her jaws around the pup’s head applying enough pressure until the pup yelps in protest; he won't play bite her again.

Call (or email) Tina for an appointment at (360) 777-8888.

JJ Enjoying a Rest

Chinook Valley Farm's JJ enjoying a rest during his training workout.


What Makes a Good Farm Dog?

Woman Holding Puppy in Lap
Jessica Moore held her puppy, Piper, a 4-month-old double-doodle lab, as Heather Suomela navigated her black lab through a gate on a loose lead during a June 24 Farm Dog Certified event at Chinook Valley Farm.

Tina Demonstrating Properly Trained Dog
Tina Woodworth demonstrated how a properly trained farm dog should behave around livestock on a working farm. J.J., Tina's 6-year-old trained German Shepherd, calmly sat as a chicken flew out of her coup. Handlers put their dogs through a real working farm environment at a certification workshop on June 24.

Meet and Greet
Dog Owners in a meet-and-greet with their canine participants at the certification workshop. The farm dog certification program presents handlers and their dogs with specified farm tasks and livestock situations. Dogs are then evaluated on demeanor and performance.

Dog Walking Past Horse
Marin McDonnell directed Mauvi, an Austrailian cattle dog, past Angelina, a Pervuian horse, at Chinook Valley Farm. In order to receive the farm dog certification, dogs must be able to walk by farm animals in a quiet and calm manner.

Man with Trained German Shepherd
Tina Woodworth runs Echowood Kennel's Valley Farm. She is AKC Breeder of Merit, certified judge, and a certified canine good citizen (CGC). Woodworth held a farm dog workshop at her farm on June 24.

Checking Dog's Dental Hygiene
Grooming evaluation is a very important part of the certification process. Tina Woodworth checked J.J.'s teeth to demonstrate proper oral hygiene.

Dog Waiting Patiently by Chickens
Cati Foss of Seaside walked her dog Lyra on a loose lead near livestock in a farm environment. The Shetland sheepdog executed this part of the test flawlessly, as the chickens crossed the road without any stress.

"A good farm dog does not chase the chickens, ducks, livestock, or the resident barn cat," veteran dog trainer and Chinook resident, Tina Woodworth said. Rewarding these trais and others is part of the program launched by the American Kennel Club two years ago, called the Farm Dog Certified (FDC) test.

In an effort to broaden AKC's reach beyond its traditional focus on purebred canines, the nation's premier organization for the dog fanciers is shining a light on the multifaceted working dogs that still play important roles on U.S. ranches and farms.

"A wide variety of dogs live in rural areas, so the FDC test is intended to demonstrate good behavior in these settings," AKC executive field representative for herding, Alison Ruhe said in a blog post. "In addition, we view this new class as an opportunity to benefit our herding clubs by attracting new dog owners to their events, introducing them to the fascinating sport of herding."

The farm dog test is conducted in a real farm environment, with real livestock, Woodworth explained before a June 24 workshop at her Chinook Valley Farm.

There are 12 test items; all of which must be completed successfully to pass.

"The dog must demonstrate self-control, courage, and trust in the handler," Woodworth said. "These all are traits vital to a working farm dog. The farm dog certification test is intended to test a dog's aptitude to work as a farm dog. It isn't meant to be an obedience test, but your dog must have basic leash-walking skills and a solid state to be successful."

The FDC program is open to all dogs — mixed breeds, as well as purebreds. Woodworth, a licensed AKC Farm Dog Certification judge, said her training plan for farm dogs is even open to dogs who have never been around livestock.

"The FDC test provides an opportunity for dogs to apply their basic training in a unique environment. One can think of it as a 'Canine Good Citizen' test on a farm," said Doug Ljungren, AKC's vice president for sports and events. "In addition to promoting responsible dog ownership, the basic manners needed for the FDC test will prepare them for many other AKC activites."

Farm Dog Tests

  • Test 1: Greet the judge — the handler approaches the judge with the dog at his side on a loose lead. The dog must not jump or show aggression or excessive shyness.
  • Test 2: Walk around the farm and a passive stranger — the handler walks the dog on a loose lead at least 200 feet around a variety of objects near a sitting person.
  • Test 3: Jump on a hay bale and sit or lie until released by the judge.
  • Test 4: Walk past farm animals — the dog must be able to walk past farm animals on a loose lead in view of pinned farm animals.
  • Test 5: Walk over or through unusual surfaces — the handler walks the dog over three unusual surfaces, such as plastic tarp, a sheet of plywood, or metal grating lying on the ground.
  • Test 6: Supervised separation — the handler places the dog in a crate and walks out of sight for a minimum of one minute.
  • Test 7: Pass through a gate — the dog stays on the handler's command while the handler opens a gate and passes through, and stays while the handler closes the gate.
  • Test 8: Reaction to another dog — the dog reamins stationary on a loose lead while another dog is walked by twice, about 10 feet away.
  • Test 9: Reaction to noise distraction — the dog is exposed to two common farm sounds, such as hammering nails, leaf blowers or tractor engines, and must not panic.
  • Test 10: Dog approaches livestock — the handler approaches pinned livestock with the dog on a loose lead. The dog may not lunge or be fearful or aggressive to the stock.
  • Test 11: Physical examination — the handler examines the dog for plant material or debris collected while working on the farm, examining the ears, coat, and toes.
 

Obedience Training Videos


Client Testimonial

Client with Dog and Certificates


Jerry & Laurie B.

"Chinook Valley Farm Dog Training Tina--just wanted to say thank you for helping us with Ruger and Roxy. Both of our dogs are rescue dogs and as you know Ruger was high anxiety, nervous and difficult to handle. On a camping trip, Laurie and I both realized that Ruger's behavior was out of control and not enjoyable. We knew we needed additional help and we are so glad we found you. After our first visit, I saw progress in Ruger's behavior.

After discussing his issues with you, your recommendation to include Roxy, our other dog, in the training was invaluable. Clearly our dogs play off of one another and both required training. For that matter, Laurie and I required your training as well--you taught us so much. After several training sessions and lots of daily work, both our dogs now walk properly on a leash, know their sit, down, stay, wait and come commands and are a joy to take for a walk. The big test was a recent camping trip where we were able to relax, enjoy our walks and with other campers without out of control dogs. Your training really made a difference! Tina—your expertise is truly appreciated training our dogs with the help of your dogs has really made a difference in our lives--Thanks so much!"

Jerry & Laurie B.
Northwest Carriage Museum
Raymond, WA


Tina, I want to thank you for helping me train my little Mini-Australian Shepherd "Scone". when I brought her to you, she was highly sight and sound sensitive. She was so fearful of loud noises, she would run blindly into the street trying to get away from her imagined danger. Anything flapping in the wind, such as flags, kites, or cloths on a line, would send her in a panic running away. I along with Lauren Jacobsen and her dog Cobber, worked with you weekly, helping Scone overcome her mental terror of these imagined monsters. My happiest day came when I took Scone to the Doggy Olympics in Longbeach, WA. Scone won the gold in the musical sit contest, most importantly, she had learned to stay focused on me.

The dogs that placed 2nd and 3rd were also obedience students of yours.

Thank-You Again
Margaret J.

Scone and Cobber


My Dog Cobber

"I brought Cobber to you for help he was displaying uncontrollable behavior. He is a male Sheepdog "Sheltie". Cobber was play biting, harassing our older dog, having temper tantrums and not coming back when called. When I tried to discipline him, he would throw himself down onto the ground in wild display of biting and rolling. After one session with you, using the "Woodworth” Method of Dog Obedience Training, I got his attention and he started to focus on what I wanted him to do. I continued working with Cobber along with two other obedience students at your farm. In a short time, all three of us were heeling ours off the lead, calling the dogs from a distance of a minimum of 100 feet. Our dog would drop into a down position on the recall. This exercise helped with having the dog's attention wherever we happened to be. Cobber went on to win the Gold, Silver, and Bronze at the Longbeach "Doggy Olympics"

He also won the "People's Choice Award" at Cannon Beach, Doggy Daze gathering. Thank you for helping understand the true meaning of having a friend and companion that brings me so much joy and is always welcome to visit other people’s home."

Lauren Jacobsen


Rupert and Boomer

"Tina, thankyou for your help with our two dogs, Rupert our Bull Terrier and Boomer our Aussie. Because both are male and both are assertive and strong breeds we were having problems with them fighting, We were afraid that the Bull Terrier would kill the Aussie even though the Aussie was usually the instigator of the fight. With your help, we have had no further problems and they get along fine. Rupert has since become blind and the training we had with you helps keep him from harm while on walks and around the house and yard.

As Rubert aged, his best friend Boomer never left his side, guiding him where ever they went."

Peggy F.


When You Buy a Puppy From Us, You Get Free Accommodations at Chinook Valley Farm!

Trailer Bedroom Trailer Kitchen Trailer Bathroom Trailer Living Room